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  • Who wants to help me install a turbo? :)

    Hey, everyone!

    Well, my order from Flyin' Miata just shipped. Got their Voodoo 2 kit for my NB.

    I've read through the instructions about 10 times over and feel reasonably confident with most of the work. However, I work very slow and it would take me weeks (months...) to actually get the install done myself.

    I'm really hoping to be able to get some people to come over one weekend and help me get this install done right. If anyone is interested, or has advice for me, please PM me.

    I'm happy to provide beer, pizza, beer, and anything else anyone might want.

    I have a garage to do the work in, and I should have all tools needed.

    Located in Roswell. I can do any weekend from 6/17 onward.

    Thanks for reading! :D:D
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  • #2
    I would love to help, but I would only slow you down.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Theo View Post
      I would love to help, but I would only slow you down.
      You have no idea how much help just having someone to be a tool-gopher can be.

      I'd send the 6-year olds up, but they're more like tool squirrels...they like to hide them where they'll never be found again :lol:
      ~Andrew
      Atlanta Region SCCA
      D Prepared Miata

      Comment


      • #4
        I will give some unsolicited advice. The lower radiator hose, the intake from the filter to the turbo, and the passenger side intercooler hose will need some sort of protection from abrasion. I used some large diameter radiator hose cut up and zip tied onto the hose that needs protecting. It is all but impossible to route those hoses so they won't be rubbing on something. FM doesn't make that clear in their instructions. The other thing I recommend is to source the mbc from right before the throttle body instead of at the turbo. You'll reach and maintain boost targets more reliably. Good luck. You're going to love it.
        Last edited by fwman1; 06-02-2017, 07:46 AM.
        2000 LS Highlight Silver/ FM turbo/ MSPNP Pro/ Flow Force 640s/ Xida CS/ asst. bling.

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        • #5
          Where in Roswell are you and when are you thinking of doing this? I'm near the traffic circle on Warsaw.

          I've done a couple, but not all in one day, start-finish. How much prep have you done? Some of the biggest obstacles are usually when the oil pan needs to be tapped, fitting the intercooler, exhaust, and unexpected maintenance that has been deferred.

          ***edit: How extensive is your tool collection on hand?***
          Last edited by kung fu jesus; 06-02-2017, 07:48 AM.

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          • #6
            I'm in East Cobb/ Roswell and could possibly drop by for a bit, however I'm working with really limited free time right now. It has been 8 years since I installed the FMII turbo kit on my car, but I think I still remember a few things :)

            An entire install in one weekend is ambitious. A few years ago Flyin' Miata built a turbo car at the Mitty and I think it was down to the wire. No matter how much experience you have there will always be something unexpected - something won't fit, you'll need a part you don't have, you'll screw something up and have to wait on a part, there will be a tool you don't have/ can't find, etc.

            My personal advice - do the job not as one big job, but as several smaller jobs. Kung Fu touched on this above. When I did mine I pulled the transmission and upgraded the clutch, I put in new injectors, I replaced the ECU with a standalone which eliminated the MAF, I changed the exhaust, I upgraded the radiator. Then, several weeks later I turned the key...and the car didn't start. So I had to work backwards through 20 different things I had changed to figure out what was wrong.

            Your install will be a little easier since it is a Voodoo kit. I'd get as much done as you can before you remove the header and bolt on the turbo and manifold. You can drill/tap your drain pan then just cap off the fitting, reroute your lower coolant hose, trim your splash pan, mount your intercooler etc beforehand.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Yup, I remember the Flyin Miata install at the Mitty. Doing the install was Bill Cardell, the owner and founder of FM, as well as Keith Tanner, FM's lead technician. Those two guys have installed more FM II's than any other mechanics on the planet, and still it was barely completed in daylight.

              Give yourself time to do all the maintenance stuff, drill the pan, fill the tank with 93 octane and upgrade your clutch and radiator at a minimum, before you move onto the big stuff. Could it be done in a weekend? If your Bill and Keith, sure. Mere mortals should plan for a slightly longer haul. Good luck, a 200 whp miata is more fun than a barrel of monkeys, you're going to have fun ��
              Red '91, MSM longblock/BEGI-FM hybrid turbo w/2871r/3"Enthuza/Hydra2.7/700cc/Ohlins/
              RacingBrake11"BBK/SS HDDD/Nakamae everything/KGWorks/Zoom/We're done!

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              • #8
                ^ That!

                I installed a Greddy and later a customized FM3 system on my car. I've helped other install theirs, but not start to finish.

                Nick is spot on. Plan it out and do it in stages that still allows you to drive the car until the mail components go in. Each of these stages can be bigger projects than they seem.

                Tapping the pan, for instance, I had to move the AC soft lines out of the way to get to the spot I wanted the oil drain to be. I had an extra set of hands to hold them back, but without that, I would had had to get creative with straps or drop the AC compressor off the bracket. The tap project took me about 2-3 hours it total.

                Fitting the intercooler was a bit frustration because of the space, working with/around other systems, test-fitting, trimming, re-fitting, and so on. Once it was done, I just took off the tubing and capped the ends of the intercooler. I think it took me the better part of a day to get it how I wanted.

                Adding the water lines was about a half day, then I went back and made custom hardlines I mandrel-bent by hand from aircraft aluminum tubing out of concerns for heat and the soft lines I was originally using.

                There was a similar concern for the oil drain. I with with custom SS braided line and -AN fittings for a better seal and heat protection.

                The exhaust work was a 3 hours to make sure the downpipe cleared the tunnel and mated to the existing exhaust. I was also wiring in a WB02 sensor at the same time.

                I would wire in the electronics before hand, so you know where you want the ports to go, the box to sit, and to familiarize yourself with the interface. Primarily, though, you will know it was installed correctly because the car should start and run fine without the turbo installed (if your kludge is boost-dependent).

                The manifold and turbo installation was probably one of the easier portions of the job.

                I will also add that if you have ANY maintenance needed, like timing belt, waterpump, seals, etc. DO THEM NOW. All that stuff is way easier without the added systems of the turbo on the car. It will give you a clean reset on the car's basic needs and makes diagnosing any issues that spring up (and there will be some) a ton easier.

                If you have any questions about what upgrades to do now, regarding the kit, let them fly. I have an overkill approach, others are more "fix it as it breaks" attitude, so I just want to be sure of your philosophy beforehand. I'm not judging, but it helps me understand your viewpoint and allows me to re-prioritize the systems during installation.
                Last edited by kung fu jesus; 06-02-2017, 12:05 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by nickt93 View Post
                  Then, several weeks later I turned the key...and the car didn't start. So I had to work backwards through 20 different things I had changed to figure out what was wrong.
                  "Hey Nick... did you plug the fuel pump relay back in?"

                  What a night. :lol:

                  -------------------------

                  I can't add a whole lot to the advice that's been provided above, it's all spot on, especially taking care of maintenance items first and doing simpler, ancillary parts of the install prior to the main event. I installed the FM Voodoo kit I have in my NB in one weekend. It's not impossible to do, but like others have said, have an action plan, a back up plan, and be prepared to not finish when expected. I've got a few turbo installs under my belt so I had a good idea of what I was facing in potential problems and planned for those, but fortunately my install went smoothly. Having another vehicle to fall back on can also make a huge difference, in case you don't finish within your planned timeframe or need to run and get some random part.

                  I approach turbo installs from a different angle, I pull the engine/trans. In my opinion, the bit of time invested in pulling that out saves a lot of time and frustration later. Items like tapping the oil pan or tightening the exhaust manifold or downpipe junction bolts are drastically easier to do. Taking care of maintenance items or installing a new clutch is much easier without having to work in a confined workspace or on your back under the car. I did all of that during my install: timing belt, water pump, all of the radiator/coolant hoses, thermostat, front and rear main seals, and a new clutch/flywheel. You can also put your eye on every side of the engine and check for any other potential issues.

                  Something I always advise for a fresh install, replace your old exhaust manifold studs. A lot of times the OE nuts have seized to the old studs and you won't be able to properly install the new manifold to the head. MiataRoadster has a $50 kit that I have used many times and recommend: LINK TO KIT

                  One more recommendation if you didn't get it already is to splurge for the FM hardline kit. Keeping rubber hoses away from the turbo is a huge plus in preventative maintenance. Replacing a split rubber hose next to a hot turbo on the side of the road is not fun.

                  I'll try to keep an eye on this thread to see what weekend you end up picking. If I can get away and make it up to your area, I'd be happy to lend a hand.

                  Originally posted by miata5620
                  Eric's Garage ... You buy all the parts I tell you to and you will have a killer car... If you want other parts used your car will suck and it will cost you more...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RotorNutFD3S View Post
                    I approach turbo installs from a different angle, I pull the engine/trans. In my opinion, the bit of time invested in pulling that out saves a lot of time and frustration later. Items like tapping the oil pan or tightening the exhaust manifold or downpipe junction bolts are drastically easier to do. Taking care of maintenance items or installing a new clutch is much easier without having to work in a confined workspace or on your back under the car. I did all of that during my install: timing belt, water pump, all of the radiator/coolant hoses, thermostat, front and rear main seals, and a new clutch/flywheel. You can also put your eye on every side of the engine and check for any other potential issues.

                    Eric, I have lost count at the number of times we have pulled a Miata motor.

                    If you(OP) have a second car then pulling the motor is really nice. The Miata motor is stupidly easy to pull(I am biased cause I've done more than I'd like to remember, between my old BRG and Eric red car).

                    If you don't have a great secondary car you can use to get to work and such, then doing task by task is a great option. It allows you to it in stages and confirm what is working and if something fails and the car doesn't start you know what small section you have worked in.
                    1988 323 GTX--- The toy now :D
                    2008 Mazdaspeed 3::SOLD ----- 1991 BRG NA8 Swap, Turbo::SOLD

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the advice!

                      I like the ideas for mounting the intercooler, radiator hose, voodoo box, etc... before starting the actual turbo install. I will get to work on the little things before having people come over to help with the turbo install. However I do have one question about tapping the oil pan: I think this is a great idea to do this ahead of time, but the FM Hard Line instructions say that the turbo must be mounted prior to drilling the oil pan. Does anyone have experience with the FM Hard line kit that could confirm or deny this? I would hate to drill the pan just to find out the hard line doesn't match up to the tap.


                      I know that getting it all done in a weekend is an unlikely task. But, if I have some helpers that can get me most of the way there, I can most likely finish up what needs to be finished.


                      Things I should have mentioned in the first post: I have recently had timing belt (including seals, water pump, etc.) done. I have the FM Happy Meal for my clutch/flywheel. I have a coolant reroute done with 949 racing radiator. I also have gauges installed and wired.


                      RotorNut, thank you for the link to the studs. I will order that kit right now.


                      Kung Fu, I generally have a overkill approach to my car. So if anyone has any recommendations on reliability parts or just generally good things to touch on during this install, please do let me know.


                      I do have a motorcycle as my secondary vehicle. So if my car has to be down for a bit it's not the end of the world.


                      As for my tool collection, I have an air compressor with a 1/2" impact gun. Various wrenches, flare nut wrenches, sockets, pliers, etc... I really do think I have everything needed for the job. But, I've said that before and ended up running to Home Depot for tools. So if anyone can think of some weird tool that may be needed, please let me know!

                      Oh, and I will be bringing my car to Rspeed soon to have them look at a check engine light I've been getting. It's a P2402 which is emissions related, but I still want it fixed before starting to do any engine modifications. I will also have them do a general inspection to make sure there is nothing that I missed that needs attention before the install.

                      Thanks again for all the advice!!
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                      • #12
                        No idea why FM would say that about the oil line. Their oil hardline looks a little janky to me the way it connects to the pan nipple with a rubber hose, but whatever. I used -an fittings on the turbo outlet and an NPT to -an fitting on the pan. The drain hose was SS. When I removed the turbo for good, I left the NPT/-an fitting on the pan and just capped it with an appropriate -an fitting. I would just tap per instructions, install the nipple and put a rubber cap and clamp on it until the turbo goes on.

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                        • #13
                          Having installed the hard line after initial install I can see why FM would say that. There is pretty much zero flex in their hard line, so it hits the oil plan in a very specific place. My oil drain fitting was not perfectly aligned with the end of the hardline, so the rubber hose that runs between the two is at a bit of an angle and has a small kink. You'd have a better shot of getting them perfectly aligned if you installed the hardline before drilling and tapping.


                          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nickt93 View Post
                            Having installed the hard line after initial install I can see why FM would say that. There is pretty much zero flex in their hard line,
                            I've not installed one, but with a hard line of any kind, you definitely want to have both ends in place before you start drilling holes in important parts.
                            ~Andrew
                            Atlanta Region SCCA
                            D Prepared Miata

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                            • #15
                              Went on the dyno last night to get a baseline before turbo.
                              120whp and 112wtq!
                              Stock Run.jpg
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