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oil priming after rebuild

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  • oil priming after rebuild

    Since the oil pump is crank driven, I know I should pull the fuel injection relay and crank it. Should the OE (1995) oil pressure gauge read something? I've cranked it for about 30 seconds. Should I go longer?

  • #2
    I think the 95 guages aren't a real oil pressure reader.
    91 BRG #3240
    Have you ever seen a guy driving a Mazda Miata and thought, “man, I wish that was me!”? Neither have I.
    Aside from the fact that this car screams “I’m fabulous!” from every angle, this car was made for the guy who wants to drive down the coast with his new scarf from Wal Mart flapping in the breeze. If you own a Miata you're one of three things: in the closet, a woman, or a ******bag.

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    • #3
      Thanks! I cranked it for another 30 seconds then I tried starting it. It didn't start :(

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      • #4
        "ain't got no gas in it."
        91 BRG #3240
        Have you ever seen a guy driving a Mazda Miata and thought, “man, I wish that was me!”? Neither have I.
        Aside from the fact that this car screams “I’m fabulous!” from every angle, this car was made for the guy who wants to drive down the coast with his new scarf from Wal Mart flapping in the breeze. If you own a Miata you're one of three things: in the closet, a woman, or a ******bag.

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        • #5
          "mmmhmm" Well, the fuel lines are probably completely dry. I turned it off and on about 10 times to try to prime fuel up to the front. Is there an easy way to check for fuel at the rail other than taking the feed line off?

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          • #6
            Pull a spark plug out and connect it to the wire then lay the tip of the plug near a valve cover bolt or tip of a screw driver thats touching ground and see if the plug sparks/lights. Fuel, Fire, Compression, and enough battery power to turn the engine fast enough to start it. See if you have spark first. Its the easiest to check as I don't think the miatas have a check valve on the fuel rail?
            91 BRG #3240
            Have you ever seen a guy driving a Mazda Miata and thought, “man, I wish that was me!”? Neither have I.
            Aside from the fact that this car screams “I’m fabulous!” from every angle, this car was made for the guy who wants to drive down the coast with his new scarf from Wal Mart flapping in the breeze. If you own a Miata you're one of three things: in the closet, a woman, or a ******bag.

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            • #7
              Correct on the schrader valve. That's why I asked :)

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              • #8
                You either have to pack the oil pump with something like petroleum jelly OR use a preluber to prime it if it's dry (new). It'll never prime itself without that.

                IMO you're better off just prelubing right before the first start anyway- then you're guaranteed to have oil throughout the engine. Prelubers are easy to DIY from old propane (grill) tanks, some home depot air fittings and a tire valve.
                | 90 Miata | Turbocharged Stock Mazda FE-dohc 2.0L engine swap | 302whp 281ftlbs |

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                • #9
                  Any links on how to make one? bear in mind I've got a 45 gallon air compressor :)

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                  • #10
                    No. But I can try to narrate it here. At the main hole in the top, you need to install a valve to control to the flow of oil. I used a swing valve- with a lever arm. This arrangement needs to screw in because you'll fill the oil here. Then drill a hole to install a typical rubber tire valve stem. It's up to you whether you install it near the top or bottom, as to how it will sit when you pressurize it. I put mine up top to the side of the swing valve.

                    On the car, you need to address the oil pump where you'll put the connection for the pressure line from the preluber. The B engines have a plug in the pump, which can be removed. On my F engine it is threaded. You should be able to up with something you can tap in and remove - this has been done before on B engines. This is the hole that's sometimes open on new pumps- I've actually had to pull the plug from old pumps and move it over.

                    Here's the port on the F pump, B is in a similar spot:


                    Plumbing fittings used to make the connection for the pressure line from the preluber:


                    Prelubing steps:
                    1. Fill preluber with ~2qts.
                    2. Install valve assembly
                    3. pressurize with 40-60psi
                    4. Connect preluber to pump connection
                    5. Turn luber upside down and elevate
                    6. Gradually open the valve until you see a good flow of oil (you will start to hear the oil pumping through the cylinder head shortly)
                    7. At the first sign of bubbles in the hose, shut the valve off and disconnect.

                    That's it. That will put about 95% of the oil in your engine, providing you have the luber vertical.
                    Last edited by FE3tMX5; 03-01-2009, 10:57 AM.
                    | 90 Miata | Turbocharged Stock Mazda FE-dohc 2.0L engine swap | 302whp 281ftlbs |

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                    • #11
                      1: remove all spark plugs so you don't have compression. Easier on the starter that way.
                      2: unplug coil pack harness and injector harness
                      3: push in clutch, crank for 30-45 seconds. If there's oil in the sump, the pump will be turning. It'll take it some time. I know from doing this about 2 months ago ;).
                      4:Once you read pressure on the gauge (the 95 isn't a REAL gauge, but I fail to see how it wouldn't at least show something), go ahead, install the plugs, injector harness and coil harness, and fire that bey0tch up.
                      ~Andrew
                      Atlanta Region SCCA
                      D Prepared Miata

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                      • #12
                        Andrew was your pump dry/new? Because the Miata (all mazda piston oil pumps) are not self priming. There was one guy a while back that cranked his fresh miata engine for minutes and never got pressure. He ended up putting some hose on the oil filter bung/mount and filled the oil pump that way- and it worked. There's got to be something in the pump to seal it up for suction.
                        | 90 Miata | Turbocharged Stock Mazda FE-dohc 2.0L engine swap | 302whp 281ftlbs |

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                        • #13
                          100% brand new, never been used, not packed w/ oil. Is that guy sure there was oil in the sump? :p
                          Originally posted by FE3tMX5 View Post
                          Andrew was your pump dry/new? Because the Miata (all mazda piston oil pumps) are not self priming. There was one guy a while back that cranked his fresh miata engine for minutes and never got pressure. He ended up putting some hose on the oil filter bung/mount and filled the oil pump that way- and it worked. There's got to be something in the pump to seal it up for suction.
                          ~Andrew
                          Atlanta Region SCCA
                          D Prepared Miata

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                          • #14
                            Apparently when the PO put in the aux fuel pump he swapped the feed/return lines. On a hunch, I pulled the hose from the fuel rail return and found a lot of gas. Swapped the lines and it fired right up. No oil dummy light and the pressure gauge reads okay.

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